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When to Appeal the Appraisal

Home appraisals are a mandatory part of the home buying and selling process so lenders can determine a home’s “official” value. Unfortunately, an appraiser may find that your home’s value is less than what you expected it to be. The good news? You are able to appeal the appraised value if one of the following situations occurs, according to themortgagereports.com:


When the appraiser uses outdated "comps"

This happens frequently because local home sales aren’t immediately reported to the public record. A real estate agent can help you find the most recent comparable (comps) sales, or if you’re aware of a recent sale, notify your lender.


When the appraiser omits home improvements

If an appraiser omits key home improvements you’ve made, it’s usually because they aren’t aware of these updates. The easiest solution is to be on-site with the appraiser, then review the appraisal when it’s completed.


When the appraiser doesn't know the local area 

When an appraiser is unfamiliar with your neighborhood, he or she may rely more heavily on data from public records to reach your home’s final valuation. If you feel this to be the case, notify your lender as soon as possible.


When the appraiser makes a mistake 

Always review your home appraisal for errors, such as incorrect information about the square footage, or the number of bedrooms and bathrooms; or omitted features, such as fireplaces and patios. Be prepared to show evidence of the mistake when you make your appeal.

Tips for Hiding Messes While Selling A Home

An important part of the home-selling process is showing it to prospective buyers. Unfortunately, that means tidying up even more frequently than you normally would, so buyers can focus on the house’s features rather than your household items. While it may not be possible to keep your home completely mess-free when you have children, below are some tips for keeping the chaos to a minimum: 


Under-bed Storage

If there’s enough space under their beds, encourage kids to keep their rooms tidy with rolling plastic or rattan storage bins. Then, use an oversized comforter or quilt— or strategically placed blankets—to hide the bins from sight 


Built-in Storage

It may be impossible to keep things from leaving kids’ rooms and entering the living room. Utilize furniture with built-in storage, such as ottomans, or clear a drawer in the entertainment center specifically to tuck away any roaming toys, games and other items.


Baskets & Trunks

If you don’t have much built-in storage or discreet space to take advantage of, consider buying decorative trunks or baskets with lids that you can place around your home


Suitcases

If you need to store toys in the back of a closet, put them in suitcases that you can easily roll and move rather than bulky plastic bins. Suitcases are also a more discreet storage option than bins when buyers glance inside the closet to gauge how much space is available.


Donation

While your kids may feel attached to every toy, stuffed animal or plaything they own, it might be time to downsize the collection. Suggest that they start a donation pile, so that their unused items can bring joy to other kids instead.

Home Features That Might be a Waste of Money

When looking for a home, there are always features seemingly everyone says you need. But by reconsidering those, you may save yourself a pretty penny. Here are five features to reconsider, especially if you’re trying to buy a house on a limited budget: 


1. Close access to mass transit

Regular commuters and people who don’t own cars might be vying for homes near public transit systems. But if you won’t be relying exclusively on these systems, you can save yourself a lot of money by living farther from these hubs. 


2. A big yard

All of that open outdoor space may look tempting at first glance. However, ask yourself how often you’ll really be using the yard. Do you have pets or children that will play in it? Will you do any outdoor entertaining? If not, the cost and time spent on lawn maintenance and landscaping may not be worth it. 


3. A top school district

Some parents will pay top dollar to send their kids to specific schools—and to live in the best school districts. If you don’t have or plan on having children while living in this house, you may want to do a little research into school districts during the homebuying process and avoid the areas where costs are higher. 


4. Amenities you won't use

Whether it’s a built-in wet bar or a double oven in the kitchen, the cost of these amenities are reflected in the home’s final price. Ask yourself if you’ll really take advantage of these features before committing to the purchase.


5. More space than you need

While large living spaces and extra rooms are nice to have, will you really use them? Be honest with yourself and save money on the price of a home, as well as on heating, cooling and cleaning costs, by buying a smaller home.

Featured Listing

Illustration

This Perry District home has been completely updated from top to bottom. It includes 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. The formal living room features a wood burning fireplace. There is also a  basement family room, and an extra room that can be used for an office or a workout room, or... Charming front porch. It is just a short walk to all the Perry District has to offer or just 1 1/2 miles to the GU, WSU, & EWU in University District.

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